Research & Resources

High-quality research can inform Responsible Fatherhood program delivery and practitioners' advice to fathers. Resources from Responsible Fatherhood programs and other programs serving families and fathers can provide activities and information for engaging fathers. 

This section offers research and resources on various topics relevant to dads and Responsible Fatherhood practitioners. Check out the featured resources and topics of interest, and visit the main library for advanced search.

Recently Added

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Book

For incarcerated fathers, prison rather than work mediates access to their families. Prison rules and staff regulate phone privileges, access to writing materials, and visits. Perhaps even more important are the ways in which the penal system shapes men’s gender performances. Incarcerated men must negotiate how they will enact violence and aggression, both in terms of the expectations placed upon inmates by the prison system and in terms of their own responses to these expectations.

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Fact Sheet

Mental health is not simply the absence of a mental disorder. Children who don’t have a mental disorder might differ in how well they are doing, and children who have the same diagnosed mental disorder might differ in their strengths and weaknesses in how they are developing and coping, and in their quality of life. Mental health as a continuum and the identification of specific mental disorders are both ways to understand how well children are doing.

 

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VIDEO

When the stress in your life just doesn’t let up, and it feels like you have no support to get through the day—let alone do everything you need to do to be the best parent you can be—it can seem like there’s nothing that can make it better. But there are resources that can help, and this kind of stress—known as “toxic stress”—doesn’t have to define your life.

Did You Know?

Done responsibly, the "rough-and-tumble" play that dads tend to prefer is good for children.

When dads are involved from birth, their children reach health and social milestones earlier and have more long-term success.

Preschoolers with actively involved fathers have stronger verbal skills.