Parenthood is Associated with Greater Well-Being for Fathers Than Mothers.

Printer Friendly, PDF & Email
Journal Name
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Journal Volume
45
Journal Issue
9
Page Count
12
Year Published
2019
Author (Individual)
Nelson-Coffey
S. Katherine
Killingsworth
Matthew
Layous
Kristin.
Cole
Steve W.
Lyubomirsky
Sonja.
Resource Type
Journal Article
Resource Format
HTML
Resource Language
English
The experiences of mothers and fathers are different in ways that could affect their well-being. Yet few studies have comprehensively examined gender differences in parents’ well-being. In the current research, we investigated such gender differences in a large representative sample (Study 1a; N = 13,007), in a community sample using validated well-being measures (Study 1b; N = 472), and in a large experience sampling study measuring happiness during caregiving activities and during interactions with children (Study 2; N = 4,930). Fathers reported greater happiness, subjective well-being, psychological need satisfaction, and daily uplifts than did men without children (Studies 1a and 1b). During caregiving experiences, fathers reported greater happiness, whereas mothers reported lower happiness, compared with their other activities. Fathers also reported relatively higher happiness when interacting with their children than did mothers (Study 2). Across all three studies and more than 18,000 participants, parenthood was associated with more positive well-being outcomes for fathers than for mothers. (Author abstract)
Info only
 

 

Do you have something you think is appropriate for the library? Submit Library Resources.