Linking mother-father differences in parenting to a typology of family parenting styles and adolescent outcomes.

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Journal Name
Journal of Family Issues
Journal Volume
28
Journal Issue
2
Page Count
30
Year Published
2007
Author (Individual)
Simons, Leslie Gordon.
Conger, Rand D.
Resource Type
Journal Article
Resource Format
Unbound
Resource Language
English
Using longitudinal data from a sample of 451 families with a child in eighth grade at the time of study, three research questions have been addressed: First, the study explored the ways in which mothers and fathers differ with regard to four parenting styles. Second, the study examined the manner in which individual parenting styles combine to form family parenting styles. Finally, the study investigated the extent to which these various styles are related to delinquency, depression, and school commitment for adolescents. Regardless of reporter, the most common family parenting styles are those in which both parents display the same style of parenting. Having two authoritative parents is associated with the most positive outcomes for adolescents. In the absence of this optimal family parenting style, there is evidence that having one authoritative parent can, in most cases, buffer a child from the deleterious consequences associated with less optimal styles of parenting. (Author abstract)

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