Research & Resources

High-quality research can inform Responsible Fatherhood program delivery and practitioners' advice to fathers. Resources from Responsible Fatherhood programs and other programs serving families and fathers can provide activities and information for engaging fathers. 

This section offers research and resources on various topics relevant to dads and Responsible Fatherhood practitioners. Check out the featured resources and topics of interest, and visit the main library for advanced search.

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Book

Across the political spectrum, unwed fatherhood is denounced as one of the leading social problems of today. Doing the Best I Can is a strikingly rich, paradigm-shifting look at fatherhood among inner-city men often dismissed as “deadbeat dads.” Kathryn Edin and Timothy J. Nelson examine how couples in challenging straits come together and get pregnant so quickly—without planning. The authors chronicle the high hopes for forging lasting family bonds that pregnancy inspires, and pinpoint the fatal flaws that often lead to the relationship’s demise.

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Fact Sheet

This tip card provides Dads with quick facts around the importance of stable and supportive coparenting for their child's wellbeing, and provides tips for effective coparenting strategies. 

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VIDEO

Dads, we know you’re juggling so many responsibilities at home right now, like other dads across the country. The National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse (NRFC) has created an important short video message to encourage and inspire dads like you to get connected and stay connected with your kids.  We know that you play an essential role in the lives of your children, your family, your workplace, your community, and in society.

Did You Know?

Dads using authoritative parenting (loving with clear boundaries and expectations) leads to better outcomes for children.

Dads who care for their newborns experience brain and hormonal changes that make it easier to bond with their children.

Children who feel close to their fathers at ages 6-9 tend to have better self-esteem and life satisfaction later in life.